Biography Of Col. R.R. Burritt USMC ret.

I have noticed the past few weeks that people are reading the blog about my father. I appreciate the attention the blog is receiving and I thank everyone who has taken time out to read the articles! I have pieced together a professional biography of my father that may interest visitors to my blog. The Marine Corps wrote the first part of this biography and published it in a program for a Change of Command ceremony that included my father. The second part is from his obituary, and explains how his career progressed  and what he has done after retirement.

Lieutenant Colonel Burritt was born Jan.8, 1928 in Cicero, Illinois. He enlisted in the Marine Corps in June 1945.  His duty stations during the next 2 1/2 years included Quantico, VA and China with the 1st Marine Division.  Sgt. Burritt was released to inactive duty in January 1948 and attended Purdue University for two years before being recalled in Feb. 1951.  In December 1951 he was promoted to Staff Sgt. While assigned to the 1st Marine Division in Korea.

During the spring of 1952, he attended Officer Candidate Screening
Course at Quantico and was commissioned a Second Lt. in May of 1952.  After attending Basic School, Lt. Burritt joined the 3rd Marine Division at Camp Pendleton and served as a platoon commander with the 3rd Marines.

He was transferred to Japan when the 3rd Marine Division was sent there during the summer of 1953.  In November of 1953, he was promoted to First
Lt. and shortly there after as Company Commander of Company H, 3rd Marines.  Another brief tour in Korea followed as Executive Officer, Company A, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines. For 26 months from August 1954 to October 1956, he served as Explosive Ordnance Disposal Officer of the 2nd Marine Division, during which time he was promoted Captain.

Captain Burritt was then assigned as inspector-Instructor of the 18th Special Infantry Company,Evanston, Illinois from Nov. 1956 to Jan. 1958.
A tour at Quantico followed where he served as a Company Commander and
Assistant S-3 in Training and Test Regiment for about two years and one
year at the Landing Force Development Center.

Taking advantage of the Bootstrap Program during the fall of 1961, he
attended George Washington University at Washington D.C. and graduated in June
of 1962 with a Bachelor of Arts degree.

After leaving college, Capt. Burritt returned to Quantico and attended
Junior School from august 1962 to June of 1963.
In August of 1963, he was again assigned to the 3rd Marine Division,
this time on Okinawa with 3rd Antitank Battalion.  His next assignment was at the Marine
Barracks, Canal Zone, Panama where he served as Executive Officer  and later becoming the Commanding Officer, during the period of Oct. 1964 to October 1967. Upon
joining the 5th Marine Division in Oct. 1967, he was promoted to Lt. Colonel
and has served in both G-3 and G-4 Sections.

From 1968 – 1970, then Lt. Colonel Burritt served as a Reconnaissance Battalion Commander, first with the Fifth Marine Division at Camp Pendleton and then the Third Marine Division in the Republic of Vietnam. From 1971 – 1972. Colonel Burritt attended the Air War College at Maxwell Air Force Base in Montgomery, AL and earned his M.A. in
Business Administration at Auburn University. He was then assigned to the USMC
Headquarters in Washington, D.C., during which he was assigned to the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, the Pentagon as an Action Officer and the Branch Chief, Far
East/ South Asia Division. On July 29, 1976, Colonel Burritt assumed command of
the Fifth Marines, the most highly decorated Regiment in the USMC.

Among the Colonel’s decorations are included the Legion of Merit with Combat
“V” and the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry with Silver Star. After
retirement from the Marine Corps, Colonel Burritt moved with his family to
Montgomery, AL and spent the next 15 years with Merrill Lynch in Montgomery.

Advertisements

About hoosierbeth

I have been researching my ancestors, your ancestors and everybody else's since 1981.
This entry was posted in My Thoughts. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s